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    Women in Love (English Edition) Door: D. H. Lawrence,

    Women in Love by D. H. Lawrence

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    Sons and Lovers (English Edition) Door: D. H. Lawrence,

    Sons and Lovers by D. H. Lawrence

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    Sons and Lovers (English Edition) Door: D. H. Lawrence,

    Sons and Lovers by D. H. Lawrence

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    Women in Love (English Edition) Door: D. H. Lawrence,

    Women in Love by D. H. Lawrence

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    Lady Chatterley's Lover Door: D. H. Lawrence,

    "Lady Chatterley's Lover" is D. H. Lawrence's controversial novel written in 1928, which tells the story of an aristocratic woman, Constance (Lady Chatterley), who has an affair with the estate's gamekeeper when her husband is paralyzed and rendered impotent. Central to the theme of the novel is the need for physical stimulation as well as mental stimulation in order to feel complete as a human being. Due to the offensive language and subject matter of the book a charge of obscenity was brought against it in a famous 1960 trial in the United Kingdom. The novel and Lawrence were cleared of the charges and for the first time the novel was allowed to be published without restriction. Presented here is the original unabridged version first published privately in Florence in 1928.

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    The Complete Novels of D. H. Lawrence Door: D. H. Lawrence,

    David Herbert Lawrence (1885–1930) was an English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, literary critic and painter. His collected works represent, among other things, an extended reflection upon the dehumanising effects of modernity and industrialisation. Some of the issues Lawrence explores are sexuality, emotional health, vitality, spontaneity, and instinct.Lawrence's opinions earned him many enemies and he endured official persecution, censorship, and misrepresentation of his creative work throughout the second half of his life, much of which he spent in a voluntary exile he called his "savage pilgrimage". At the time of his death, his public reputation was that of a pornographer who had wasted his considerable talents. E. M. Forster, in an obituary notice, challenged this widely held view, describing him as "the greatest imaginative novelist of our generation." Later, Cambridge critic F. R. Leavis championed both his artistic integrity and his moral seriousness, placing much of Lawrence's fiction within the canonical "great tradition" of the English novel.

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    Twilight in Italy (Golden Deer Classics) (English Edition) Door: D.H Lawrence,

    D. H. Lawrence, in full David Herbert Lawrence (1885-1930), was an English author of novels, poems, plays, short stories, essays and travel books. He is valued by many as a visionary thinker and significant representative of modernism, as well as one of the finest writers in English literature. His novels "Sons and Lovers" (1913), "The Rainbow" (1915), and "Women in Love" (1920) made him one of the most influential English writers of the 20th century. Much is said of Lawrence's fiction, but many have forgotten about his remarkable travel writing. "Twilight in Italy" is a small book of travel essays, worth reading for the light they throw on the context of Lawrence's work. The novel takes us on a foot tour of the Alps all the way down into the Verdant Gardens and the sun-soaked plazas of Italy. Lawrence gives us small stories here and there that not only share a sense of place, but also relate the experience of a real traveler.

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    Lady Chatterley's Lover Door: D. H. Lawrence,

    "Lady Chatterley's Lover" is D. H. Lawrence's controversial novel written in 1928, which tells the story of an aristocratic woman, Constance (Lady Chatterley), who has an affair with the estate's gamekeeper when her husband is paralyzed and rendered impotent. Central to the theme of the novel is the need for physical stimulation as well as mental stimulation in order to feel complete as a human being. Due to the offensive language and subject matter of the book a charge of obscenity was brought against it in a famous 1960 trial in the United Kingdom. The novel and Lawrence were cleared of the charges and for the first time the novel was allowed to be published without restriction. Presented here is the original unabridged version first published privately in Florence in 1928.

  • girls-from-weintraub

    The Complete Novels of D. H. Lawrence Door: D. H. Lawrence,

    David Herbert Lawrence (1885–1930) was an English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, literary critic and painter. His collected works represent, among other things, an extended reflection upon the dehumanising effects of modernity and industrialisation. Some of the issues Lawrence explores are sexuality, emotional health, vitality, spontaneity, and instinct.Lawrence's opinions earned him many enemies and he endured official persecution, censorship, and misrepresentation of his creative work throughout the second half of his life, much of which he spent in a voluntary exile he called his "savage pilgrimage". At the time of his death, his public reputation was that of a pornographer who had wasted his considerable talents. E. M. Forster, in an obituary notice, challenged this widely held view, describing him as "the greatest imaginative novelist of our generation." Later, Cambridge critic F. R. Leavis championed both his artistic integrity and his moral seriousness, placing much of Lawrence's fiction within the canonical "great tradition" of the English novel.

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    Sons and Lovers (English Edition) Door: D. H. Lawrence,

    Sons and Lovers is a 1913 novel by the English writer D. H. Lawrence, originally published by B.W. Huebsch Publishers. The Modern Library placed it ninth on their list of the 100 best novels of the 20th century. While the novel initially received a lukewarm critical reception, along with allegations of obscenity, it is today regarded as a masterpiece by many critics and is often regarded as Lawrence's finest achievement.

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    Lady Chatterley's Lover: By D. H. Lawrence & Illustrated (English Edition) Door: D. H. Lawrence,

    How is this book unique? Illustrations includedUnabridgedLady Chatterley's Lover is a novel by D. H. Lawrence, first published in 1928. The first edition was printed privately in Florence, Italy, with assistance from Pino Orioli; an unexpurgated edition could not be published openly in the United Kingdom until 1960. (A private edition was issued by Inky Stephensen's Mandrake Press in 1929.) The book soon became notorious for its story of the physical (and emotional) relationship between a working class man and an upper class woman, its explicit descriptions of sex, and its use of then-unprintable words. The story is said to have originated from events in Lawrence's own unhappy domestic life, and he took inspiration for the settings of the book from Eastwood, Nottinghamshire, where he grew up. According to some critics, the fling of Lady Ottoline Morrell with "Tiger", a young stonemason who came to carve plinths for her garden statues, also influenced the story. Lawrence at one time considered calling the novel Tenderness and made significant alterations to the text and story in the process of its composition. It has been published in three versions.

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    Sons and Lovers: By D. H. Lawrence : Illustrated (English Edition) Door: D. H. Lawrence,

    About Sons and Lovers by D. H. LawrenceHow is this book unique?E-reader & tablet formatted, Font Adjustments100% Original contentUnabridged EditionAuthor Biography InsideIllustrations includedSons and Lovers is a 1913 novel by the English writer D. H. Lawrence. The Modern Library placed it ninth on their list of the 100 best novels of the 20th century. While the novel initially incited a lukewarm critical reception, along with allegations of obscenity, it is today regarded as a masterpiece by many critics and is often regarded as Lawrence's finest achievement. Lawrence rewrote the work four times until he was happy with it. Although before publication the work was usually titled Paul Morel, Lawrence finally settled on Sons and Lovers. Just as the new title makes the work less focused on a central character, many of the later additions broadened the scope of the work, thereby making the work less autobiographical. While some of the edits by Garnett were on the grounds of propriety or style, others would once more narrow the emphasis back upon Paul.

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    Women In Love: By D. H. Lawrence - Illustrated (English Edition) Door: D. H. Lawrence,

    How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged EditionTablet and e-reader formattedShort Biography is also included15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to readBest fiction books of all timeBestselling NovelClassic historical fiction booksWomen in Love is a novel by British author D. H. Lawrence published in 1920. It is a sequel to his earlier novel The Rainbow (1915), and follows the continuing loves and lives of the Brangwen sisters, Gudrun and Ursula. Gudrun Brangwen, an artist, pursues a destructive relationship with Gerald Crich, an industrialist. Lawrence contrasts this pair with the love that develops between Ursula and Rupert Birkin, an alienated intellectual who articulates many opinions associated with the author. The emotional relationships thus established are given further depth and tension by an intense psychological and physical attraction between Gerald and Rupert. The novel ranges over the whole of British society before the time of the First World War and eventually ends high up in the snows of the Tyrolean Alps. Ursula's character draws on Lawrence's wife Frieda, and Gudrun on Katherine Mansfield, while Rupert Birkin has elements of Lawrence himself, and Gerald Crich of Mansfield's husband, John Middleton Murry.

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    Sons and Lovers Door: D.H. Lawrence,

    Sons and Lovers is a 1913 novel by the English writer D. H. Lawrence, originally published by B.W. Huebsch Publishers. The Modern Library placed it ninth on their list of the 100 best novels of the 20th century. While the novel initially received a lukewarm critical reception, along with allegations of obscenity, it is today regarded as a masterpiece by many critics and is often regarded as Lawrence's finest achievement.The refined daughter of a "good old burgher family," Gertrude Coppard meets a rough-hewn miner, Walter Morel, at a Christmas dance and falls into a whirlwind romance characterised by physical passion. But soon after her marriage to Walter, she realises the difficulties of living off his meagre salary in a rented house. The couple fight and drift apart and Walter retreats to the pub after work each day. Gradually, Mrs. Morel's affections shift to her sons beginning with the oldest, William.As a boy, William is so attached to his mother that he doesn't enjoy the fair without her. As he grows older, he defends her against his father's occasional violence. Eventually, he leaves their Nottinghamshire home for a job in London, where he begins to rise up into the middle class. He is engaged, but he detests the girl's superficiality. He dies and Mrs. Morel is heartbroken, but when Paul catches pneumonia she rediscovers her love for her second son. Both repulsed by and drawn to his mother, Paul is afraid to leave her but wants to go out on his own, and needs to experience love. Gradually, he falls into a relationship with Miriam, a farmer's daughter who attends his church. The two take long walks and have intellectual conversations about books but Paul resists, in part because his mother disapproves.At Miriam's family's farm, Paul meets Clara Dawes, a young woman with, apparently, feminist sympathies who has separated from her husband, Baxter. After pressuring Miriam into a physical relationship, which he finds unsatisfying, Paul breaks with her as he grows more intimate with Clara, who is more passionate physically. But even she cannot hold him and he returns to his mother. When his mother dies soon after, he is alone. Lawrence summarised the plot in a letter to Edward Garnett on 12 November 1912: It follows this idea: a woman of character and refinement goes into the lower class, and has no satisfaction in her own life. She has had a passion for her husband, so her children are born of passion, and have heaps of vitality. But as her sons grow up she selects them as lovers — first the eldest, then the second. These sons are urged into life by their reciprocal love of their mother — urged on and on. But when they come to manhood, they can't love, because their mother is the strongest power in their lives, and holds them. It's rather like Goethe and his mother and Frau von Stein and Christiana — As soon as the young men come into contact with women, there's a split.William gives his sex to a fribble, and his mother holds his soul. But the split kills him, because he doesn't know where he is. The next son gets a woman who fights for his soul – fights his mother. The son loves his mother – all the sons hate and are jealous of the father. The battle goes on between the mother and the girl, with the son as object. The mother gradually proves stronger, because of the ties of blood. The son decides to leave his soul in his mother's hands, and, like his elder brother go for passion. He gets passion. Then the split begins to tell again. But, almost unconsciously, the mother realises what is the matter, and begins to die. The son casts off his mistress, attends to his mother dying. He is left in the end naked of everything, with the drift towards death.

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    The Rainbow - Golden Edittion - [University Of Chicago Press] - (ILLUSTRATED) (English Edition) Door: D. H. Lawrence,

    "Set against the backdrop of a rapidly industrializing England, the bewildering shift in social structure, the fading away of traditions and the advent of new ways of life, The Rainbow by DH Lawrence depicts how one family's story becomes the story of a society.Originally planned as a novel titled The Sisters, Lawrence finally split the theme into two separate novels after many revisions and rewrites. The Rainbow is the first novel in the Brangwen family saga.Tom Brangwen is a small time farmer in rural Nottinghamshire. He meets Lydia Lensky, an aristocratic Polish refugee and widow who has a daughter, Anna, from her previous marriage. Tom is fascinated by Lydia's “foreignness” and soon proposes marriage. The couple lives a happy and contented life. They have two sons of their own. They live quietly, and the smooth tenor of their lives is interrupted occasionally by Anna's restlessness and haughty ways. When Will, who is Tom's distant relative, comes to visit, Anna falls in love with him. The family is happy and supportive and the two marry in the local church. However, Anna's illusions are soon shattered. Will is also bewildered by the changes he finds in Anna when she becomes a mother. Their daughter Ursula becomes his support and confidant.The Rainbow was subjected to severe criticism and censorship when it was first published in 1915. Lawrence's frank treatment of human desires and women's feelings was considered to be a corrupting influence and the book was condemned in an obscenity trial in the same year. This resulted in it being banned for more than a decade in Britain. Copies of the book were seized and burnt. However, modern day readers may find it relatively “tame” and free of anything offensive. The Rainbow is a sensitive and compassionate view of the human condition and the three women characters are extremely memorable and remarkably portrayed. Lawrence later wrote the sequel, Women in Love which follows the lives of Ursula and her sister Gudrun.Another notable feature in The Rainbow is Lawrence's close connection with Nature. Added to this is the sweeping scale and scope of the narrative which spans a long half century in time. In The Rainbow, we find many memorable lesser characters and side plots, which make it a complete and extremely fulfilling work of art.As a novel by a writer known for his concern about the dehumanizing effect of industrialization, the emotional health of people and their conflict with rigid social structures and attitudes, The Rainbow is indeed a great book to experience."

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    Sons and Lovers (English Edition) Door: D. H Lawrence,

    Sons and Lovers is a 1913 novel by the English writer D. H. Lawrence, originally published by B.W. Huebsch Publishers. The Modern Library placed it ninth on their list of the 100 best novels of the 20th century. While the novel initially received a lukewarm critical reception, along with allegations of obscenity, it is today regarded as a masterpiece by many critics and is often regarded as Lawrence's finest achievement.

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    The Widowing of Mrs. Holroyd (English Edition) Door: D. H Lawrence,

    The Widowing of Mrs. Holroyd is a play by the English writer D. H. Lawrence. It was written in 1911 and the revised version was published in 1914. It is the dramatisation of Lawrence's short story "Odour of Chrysanthemums

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    Women in Love (English Edition) Door: D. H Lawrence,

    Women in Love is a novel by British author D. H. Lawrence, published in 1920. It is a sequel to his earlier novel The Rainbow (1915), and follows the continuing loves and lives of the Brangwen sisters, Gudrun and Ursula. Gudrun Brangwen, an artist, pursues a destructive relationship with Gerald Crich, an industrialist. Lawrence contrasts this pair with the love that develops between Ursula Brangwen and Rupert Birkin, an alienated intellectual who articulates many opinions associated with the author. The emotional relationships thus established are given further depth and tension by an intense psychological and physical attraction between Gerald and Rupert. The novel ranges over the whole of British society before the time of the First World War and eventually concludes in the snows of the Tyrolean Alps. Ursula's character draws on Lawrence's wife Frieda and Gudrun's on Katherine Mansfield, while Rupert Birkin's has elements of Lawrence and Gerald Crich's of Mansfield's husband, John Middleton Murry

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    Women in Love - Great Illustrated Classics - [Classics Of World Literature] - (ILLUSTRATED) (English Edition) Door: D. H. Lawrence,

    "If you have read DH Lawrence's The Rainbow, you'd certainly want to read the sequel, Women in Love. Published in 1920, the two books were originally meant to be a single work, spanning several generations of the Brangwen family, especially the women. However, a complicated publishing history, delays and editorial revisions, followed by the hostile reception and controversies that faced The Rainbow led to a gap of five years between the two books.Yet, by 21st century standards, Women in Love seems almost tame, and modern-day readers may well be bewildered by the amount of criticism it generated among the custodians of morals in an earlier age. The moral backlash prevented many readers from appreciating the true nature and depth of this insightful novel.The plot deals with the continuing saga of the Brangwen sisters, Ursula and Gudrun. Gudrun falls in love with a wealthy industrial tycoon, Gerald Crich while Ursula's heart is captured by a school inspector, Rupert Birkin. However, Birkin is also a passionate and intellectual man, whose unconventional ideas attract Ursula. Spanning the time before and during World War I, Lawrence drew many of the characters from real life. Ursula was based on his own wife, Frieda, while Birkin is a close self-portrait of himself. His friend Katharine Mansfield comes alive as Gudrun and Gerald Crich, her husband John Middleton Murry. Hence, the book is also an invaluable biography of contemporary writers and their lives.Though the book examines physical and emotional love in a frank and fearless way, Lawrence's critics suggested that it was also told from a male chauvinistic point of view. Lawrence was deeply influenced by Freudian psycho-analysis and also by the philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche. Victorian ideas of a woman's role, her rights and her expectations were undergoing a sea-change at this time. Her desire to work at a job outside the home, earn an independent living and the blurring of social boundaries are other themes that Lawrence felt deeply about and depicts in this book. The conflict between society's conventions and individual desires is another theme that runs through Women in Love. The dawn of the Industrial Revolution was about to change the structure of society forever and we find Lawrence's characters, grappling with changing ideas and vanishing traditions.Women in Love also contains many of the characters who appear in The Rainbow, like Tom, Anna and Billy Brangwen. Tom Brangwen's struggle with the ideas and ways of his unconventional daughters also forms part of the story.An interesting and absorbing read!"

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    Women in Love - Great Annotations - [ Routledge Edition] - (ILLUSTRATED) (English Edition) Door: D. H. Lawrence,

    "If you have read DH Lawrence's The Rainbow, you'd certainly want to read the sequel, Women in Love. Published in 1920, the two books were originally meant to be a single work, spanning several generations of the Brangwen family, especially the women. However, a complicated publishing history, delays and editorial revisions, followed by the hostile reception and controversies that faced The Rainbow led to a gap of five years between the two books.Yet, by 21st century standards, Women in Love seems almost tame, and modern-day readers may well be bewildered by the amount of criticism it generated among the custodians of morals in an earlier age. The moral backlash prevented many readers from appreciating the true nature and depth of this insightful novel.The plot deals with the continuing saga of the Brangwen sisters, Ursula and Gudrun. Gudrun falls in love with a wealthy industrial tycoon, Gerald Crich while Ursula's heart is captured by a school inspector, Rupert Birkin. However, Birkin is also a passionate and intellectual man, whose unconventional ideas attract Ursula. Spanning the time before and during World War I, Lawrence drew many of the characters from real life. Ursula was based on his own wife, Frieda, while Birkin is a close self-portrait of himself. His friend Katharine Mansfield comes alive as Gudrun and Gerald Crich, her husband John Middleton Murry. Hence, the book is also an invaluable biography of contemporary writers and their lives.Though the book examines physical and emotional love in a frank and fearless way, Lawrence's critics suggested that it was also told from a male chauvinistic point of view. Lawrence was deeply influenced by Freudian psycho-analysis and also by the philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche. Victorian ideas of a woman's role, her rights and her expectations were undergoing a sea-change at this time. Her desire to work at a job outside the home, earn an independent living and the blurring of social boundaries are other themes that Lawrence felt deeply about and depicts in this book. The conflict between society's conventions and individual desires is another theme that runs through Women in Love. The dawn of the Industrial Revolution was about to change the structure of society forever and we find Lawrence's characters, grappling with changing ideas and vanishing traditions.Women in Love also contains many of the characters who appear in The Rainbow, like Tom, Anna and Billy Brangwen. Tom Brangwen's struggle with the ideas and ways of his unconventional daughters also forms part of the story.An interesting and absorbing read!"