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    The Mill on the Floss (English Edition) Door: George Eliot,

    The Mill on the Floss by George Eliot

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    Daniel Deronda (English Edition) Door: George Eliot,

    "Daniel Deronda" is the novel of the outstanding English writer George Eliot whose real name is Mary Ann Evans. She is the author of world-famous books about the vicissitudes of human destiny. Daniel Deronda rescues the Jewish girl who came to England from suicide. They become friends soon. But Deronda is secretly in love with Gwendolen. Her fate is unenviable: living in a marriage without love, she brutally suffers until she meets Daniel Deronda. Illustrations by Elena Odarich.

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    The Mill on the Floss (English Edition) Door: George Eliot,

    The Mill on the Floss by George Eliot

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    Adam Bede (English Edition) Door: George Eliot,

    Adam Bede by George Eliot

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    Middlemarch (English Edition) Door: George Eliot,

    Middlemarch by George Eliot

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    Silas Marner (Dream Classics) Door: George Eliot,

    Silas Marner : The Weaver of Raveloe is the third novel by George Eliot, published in 1861. An outwardly simple tale of a linen weaver, it is notable for its strong realism and its sophisticated treatment of a variety of issues ranging from religion to industrialisation to community.Wrongly accused of theft and exiled by community of Lantern Yard, Silas Marner settles in the village of Raveloe, living as a recluse and caring only for work and money. Bitter and unhappy, Silas' circumstances change when an orphaned child, actually the unaknowledged child of Godfrey Cass, eldest son of the local squire, is left in his care.with HTML Table Of ContentsBe sure to check out our other books available !

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    Daniel Deronda: (Annotated) (English Edition) Door: George Eliot,

    Books are like mirrors: if a fool looks in, you cannot expect a genius to look out.–J.K. Rowling

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    Middlemarch: (Annotated) (English Edition) Door: George Eliot,

    Books are like mirrors: if a fool looks in, you cannot expect a genius to look out.–J.K. Rowling

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    Romola: (Annotated) (English Edition) Door: George Eliot,

    Books are like mirrors: if a fool looks in, you cannot expect a genius to look out.–J.K. Rowling

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    Daniel Deronda [Special edition] (Annotated) (English Edition) Door: George Eliot,

    A lovely young woman gambling at a casino in Leubronn, Germany. A young man watches, fascinated from afar. She begins to lose heavily and leaves the casino. Thus opens the last and probably the most controversial of George Eliot's novels.Published in 1876, Daniel Deronda is also the only one in which the great Victorian novelist portrays contemporary society of her own time. There were only a few murmurs when it first came out, but later, they became a full fledged outpouring of resentment against what many readers felt was an extremely controversial stand on Jewish, proto-Zionist and Kabbalistic ideas. However, it was not just the non-Jewish people who were offended. In 1889, many Jewish people also called for a revision of the book.Whatever the controversies and difficulties that readers had and perhaps still have with the book, it remains one of the most hard hitting and objective portrayals of race, identity, politics, Imperialism, gender bias, religious tolerance and prejudice.The novel actually brings two separate streams of narrative together and they are connected by means of the character of Daniel Deronda, a wealthy young man whose altruistic nature leads him into all manner of troubles. He is the ward of an aristocratic millionaire and knows little about his own birth. Once he comes in contact with the Jewish people, he begins to suspect that he is indeed one of them.Though the title of the story would give the impression that the tale's focus is its eponymous hero, Daniel Deronda, the reader is taken by surprise to find that Gwendolen Harleth shares the limelight in equal measure. She is one of the least lovable of heroines in literature, yet her shallow snobbery, wit, the depth of her despair and her overwhelming narcissism (in one scene we find her kissing her own image in the mirror!) make her an unforgettable character. For her, marriage is a ticket to the higher echelons of society. Caught in an abusive marriage which she entered into for her own ends, she begins to depend on Daniel Deronda whose generous nature makes him ever willing to extend a helping hand.Scholars have noted that George Eliot (or Mary Ann Evans to give her real name) was probably influenced to write Daniel Deronda after meeting Emmanuel Deutsch, a Jewish scholar and Zionist. The character of Mordecai Cohen in the novel is presumed to be based on Deutsch.As the brilliant final work of Daniel Deronda, this book retains its appeal due to its gripping plot, the depth of social issues being raised in it and the remarkable characters.

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    Daniel Deronda (English Edition) Door: George Eliot,

    Daniel Deronda by George Eliot

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    Middlemarch (English Edition) Door: George Eliot,

    Middlemarch by George Eliot

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    Adam Bede: (Annotated) (English Edition) Door: George Eliot,

    Books are like mirrors: if a fool looks in, you cannot expect a genius to look out.–J.K. Rowling

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    Daniel Deronda (English Edition) Door: George Eliot,

    Daniel Deronda by George Eliot

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    Adam Bede - George Eliot [First edition] (Annotated) (English Edition) Door: George Eliot,

    A young carpenter falls in love with the village beauty. She, however, has set her sights on a dashing army captain who's the son of the wealthy local squire. Meanwhile, a beautiful and virtuous young woman preacher arrives in the village. What happens to these people and the strange twists and turns that their lives take are described in the rest of the book.Adam Bede was George Eliot's first published novel. Published in 1859, the book has remained a firm favorite with readers and academicians alike and is still taught in many English literature courses all over the world.George Eliot was the pen name of well respected scholar, translator and journalist Mary Ann Evans. She adopted a male pseudonym so she could be viewed as a serious writer. Many Victorian women writers had to combat the prevailing notion that women novelists wrote only light hearted romances or Gothic tales.Eliot was largely a self taught person. Her father was the manager of a stately home in Warwickshire and it was here that Eliot had access to the extensive library. She was a voracious reader and taught herself the Classical languages, which she draws upon extensively in her work. In fact, only one of her seven novels can be set without using Greek typeface. Living on the estate also provided her a view of the immense contrast between the lives of the workers and the landowners.She began writing for a radical left-wing journal, The Westminster Review. One of her essays was titled “Silly Novels by Lady Novelists” in which she criticized the dramatic and over emotional writing style and plots of books written by women. Following this, she decided to disprove the theory that women were only capable of such work. A series of stories entitled Scenes of a Clerical Life was published under the pseudonym George Eliot in 1857. Adam Bede was her first complete novel. It met with immediate success and there was intense speculation about the real identity of its author. When impostors began to emerge, claiming authorship, Mary Ann Evans revealed herself to be the real person behind the name.Adam Bede is notable for its compassion and humane outlook on life. Charles Dickens praised it for its authentic representation of rural life. Though many critics have found the plot to be contrived and subject to frequent “meddling” by the author herself, the story remains interesting and engaging even today more than a hundred years after it was first published.

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    Silas Marner - George Eliot [First edition] (Annotated) (English Edition) Door: George Eliot,

    One of the most memorable scenes in this novel occurs in Chapter Twelve, when the dejected and desolate Silas Marner steps outside his lonely cottage on New Year's Eve. He suffers from one of his bizarre fits of catalepsy and stands frozen for a few seconds. When he regains consciousness, he returns to his fireside. There in front of the warm blaze he imagines he sees a heap of gold! The very gold that had been robbed from his house many years ago. He stretches out his hand to touch it. Instead of hard metal, he encounters a soft head of golden hair. It is a little child who has wandered in out of the cold winter night...Silas Marner or The Weaver of Raveloe was George Eliot's third book. It was published in 1861 and is notable for its very sensitive treatment of the burning issues of the day: industrialization, religion, individualism and the community and the idea of character as destiny. The apparently simple plot is however a framework that holds together a complex structure of symbolism and great historical accuracy.The story portrays young Silas Marner who works as a weaver in Lantern Yard, a fictitious industrialized town in the Midlands. He is falsely accused of stealing the Calvinist congregation's church funds while watching over the dying deacon. In reality the clues point to his best friend, but Marner is declared guilty and forced to leave town. He settles down in the distant rural village of Raveloe. Here he lives as a recluse, amassing considerable wealth from his expertise as a weaver. One night, the gold which he hoards in his cottage is mysteriously stolen, pushing him over the edge into deep depression. One night, an orphan child wanders by chance into his cottage and for Silas, this is the turning point in his life.Filled with memorable characters and steeped in the rural atmosphere of Victorian rural England, Silas Marner is ultimately a tale of love and hope. The reclusive, miserly weaver is transformed by the love of a child. The novel also explores the crisis of faith that George Eliot herself suffered. She was also deeply concerned about the changes that industrialization was bringing to the traditional English way of life. The moral and ethical transformations that people experienced in the space of a single generation are vividly portrayed in this novel.As a tribute to Wordsworth's ideal that the Child is the Father of Man, Silas Marner is a deeply engrossing and poignant story that both young and old will enjoy.

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    Silas Marner (English Edition) Door: George Eliot,

    In Silas Marner, Silas flees his strict religious community after being framed for a crime he didn't commit. He settles on the outskirts of a small town, where he becomes a wealthy but unfeeling weaver. His faith is restored when he adopts a young orphan girl.At the beginning of the novel, Silas loses everything when a man he thought to be a good friend frames him for a crime that the friend himself committed. He believes his faith will protect him, but when God doesn't defend his innocence, he abandons his religion.After fleeing his home, Silas settles in a small town, where he devotes himself to weaving linen and amassing a small fortune. His world is turned upside down, however, when he's robbed around Christmas.A young golden-haired girl arrives on his doorstep. He takes her in, and this allows him to join the community and the church that he has been avoiding for fifteen years. In the end, Silas recovers his faith and believes that God sent him the child as a reward.

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    Middlemarch (English Edition) Door: George Eliot,

    Who that cares much to know the history of man, and how the mysteriousmixture behaves under the varying experiments of Time, has not dwelt,at least briefly, on the life of Saint Theresa, has not smiled withsome gentleness at the thought of the little girl walking forth onemorning hand-in-hand with her still smaller brother, to go and seekmartyrdom in the country of the Moors? Out they toddled from ruggedAvila, wide-eyed and helpless-looking as two fawns, but with humanhearts, already beating to a national idea; until domestic reality metthem in the shape of uncles, and turned them back from their greatresolve. That child-pilgrimage was a fit beginning. Theresa'spassionate, ideal nature demanded an epic life: what were many-volumedromances of chivalry and the social conquests of a brilliant girl toher? Her flame quickly burned up that light fuel; and, fed fromwithin, soared after some illimitable satisfaction, some object whichwould never justify weariness, which would reconcile self-despair withthe rapturous consciousness of life beyond self. She found her epos inthe reform of a religious order.That Spanish woman who lived three hundred years ago, was certainly notthe last of her kind. Many Theresas have been born who found forthemselves no epic life wherein there was a constant unfolding offar-resonant action; perhaps only a life of mistakes, the offspring ofa certain spiritual grandeur ill-matched with the meanness ofopportunity; perhaps a tragic failure which found no sacred poet andsank unwept into oblivion. With dim lights and tangled circumstancethey tried to shape their thought and deed in noble agreement; butafter all, to common eyes their struggles seemed mere inconsistency andformlessness; for these later-born Theresas were helped by no coherentsocial faith and order which could perform the function of knowledgefor the ardently willing soul. Their ardor alternated between a vagueideal and the common yearning of womanhood; so that the one wasdisapproved as extravagance, and the other condemned as a lapse.

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    The Lifted Veil: Adapted for the Contemporary Reader (English Edition) Door: George Eliot,

    The Lifted Veil is a novella by George Eliot, first published in 1859. Quite unlike the realistic fiction for which Eliot is best known, The Lifted Veil explores themes of extrasensory perception, the essence of physical life, possible life after death, and the power of fate. This book has been carefully adapted into modern English to allow for easy reading.

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    Middlemarch (French Edition) Door: George Eliot,

    Middlemarch originates in two unfinished pieces that Eliot worked on during the years 1869 and 1870: the novel "Middlemarch" (which focused on the character of Lydgate) and the long story "Miss Brooke" (which focused on the character of Dorothea). The former piece is first mentioned in her journal on 1 January 1869 as one of the tasks for the coming year. In August she began writing, but progress ceased in the following month amidst a lack of confidence about it and distraction caused by the illness of George Henry Lewes's son Thornie, who was dying of tuberculosis. (Eliot had been living with Lewes since 1854 as part of an open marriage.) Following Thornie's death on 19 October 1869, all work on the novel stopped; it is uncertain at this point whether or not Eliot intended to revive it at a later date. In December she writes of having begun another story, on a subject that she had considered "ever since I began to write fiction". By the end of the month she had written a hundred pages of this story and entitled it "Miss Brooke". Although a precise date is unknown, the process of incorporating material from "Middlemarch" into the story she had been working on was ongoing by March 1871. In the process of composition, Eliot compiled a notebook of hundreds of literary quotations including excerpts from poets, historians, playwrights, philosophers, and critics in eight different languages