George Eliot Boeken download gratis

342 Boeken for download gratis

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Daniel Deronda (English Edition) Door: George Eliot,

    Daniel Deronda by George Eliot

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Middlemarch (English Edition) Door: George Eliot,

    Middlemarch by George Eliot

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Daniel Deronda - George Eliot [Ignatius critical editions] (Annotated) (English Edition) Door: George Eliot,

    "A lovely young woman gambling at a casino in Leubronn, Germany. A young man watches, fascinated from afar. She begins to lose heavily and leaves the casino. Thus opens the last and probably the most controversial of George Eliot's novels.Published in 1876, Daniel Deronda is also the only one in which the great Victorian novelist portrays contemporary society of her own time. There were only a few murmurs when it first came out, but later, they became a full fledged outpouring of resentment against what many readers felt was an extremely controversial stand on Jewish, proto-Zionist and Kabbalistic ideas. However, it was not just the non-Jewish people who were offended. In 1889, many Jewish people also called for a revision of the book.Whatever the controversies and difficulties that readers had and perhaps still have with the book, it remains one of the most hard hitting and objective portrayals of race, identity, politics, Imperialism, gender bias, religious tolerance and prejudice.The novel actually brings two separate streams of narrative together and they are connected by means of the character of Daniel Deronda, a wealthy young man whose altruistic nature leads him into all manner of troubles. He is the ward of an aristocratic millionaire and knows little about his own birth. Once he comes in contact with the Jewish people, he begins to suspect that he is indeed one of them.Though the title of the story would give the impression that the tale's focus is its eponymous hero, Daniel Deronda, the reader is taken by surprise to find that Gwendolen Harleth shares the limelight in equal measure. She is one of the least lovable of heroines in literature, yet her shallow snobbery, wit, the depth of her despair and her overwhelming narcissism (in one scene we find her kissing her own image in the mirror!) make her an unforgettable character. For her, marriage is a ticket to the higher echelons of society. Caught in an abusive marriage which she entered into for her own ends, she begins to depend on Daniel Deronda whose generous nature makes him ever willing to extend a helping hand.Scholars have noted that George Eliot (or Mary Ann Evans to give her real name) was probably influenced to write Daniel Deronda after meeting Emmanuel Deutsch, a Jewish scholar and Zionist. The character of Mordecai Cohen in the novel is presumed to be based on Deutsch.As the brilliant final work of Daniel Deronda, this book retains its appeal due to its gripping plot, the depth of social issues being raised in it and the remarkable characters."

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Daniel Deronda - George Eliot [Modern library classics] (Annotated) (English Edition) Door: George Eliot,

    "A lovely young woman gambling at a casino in Leubronn, Germany. A young man watches, fascinated from afar. She begins to lose heavily and leaves the casino. Thus opens the last and probably the most controversial of George Eliot's novels.Published in 1876, Daniel Deronda is also the only one in which the great Victorian novelist portrays contemporary society of her own time. There were only a few murmurs when it first came out, but later, they became a full fledged outpouring of resentment against what many readers felt was an extremely controversial stand on Jewish, proto-Zionist and Kabbalistic ideas. However, it was not just the non-Jewish people who were offended. In 1889, many Jewish people also called for a revision of the book.Whatever the controversies and difficulties that readers had and perhaps still have with the book, it remains one of the most hard hitting and objective portrayals of race, identity, politics, Imperialism, gender bias, religious tolerance and prejudice.The novel actually brings two separate streams of narrative together and they are connected by means of the character of Daniel Deronda, a wealthy young man whose altruistic nature leads him into all manner of troubles. He is the ward of an aristocratic millionaire and knows little about his own birth. Once he comes in contact with the Jewish people, he begins to suspect that he is indeed one of them.Though the title of the story would give the impression that the tale's focus is its eponymous hero, Daniel Deronda, the reader is taken by surprise to find that Gwendolen Harleth shares the limelight in equal measure. She is one of the least lovable of heroines in literature, yet her shallow snobbery, wit, the depth of her despair and her overwhelming narcissism (in one scene we find her kissing her own image in the mirror!) make her an unforgettable character. For her, marriage is a ticket to the higher echelons of society. Caught in an abusive marriage which she entered into for her own ends, she begins to depend on Daniel Deronda whose generous nature makes him ever willing to extend a helping hand.Scholars have noted that George Eliot (or Mary Ann Evans to give her real name) was probably influenced to write Daniel Deronda after meeting Emmanuel Deutsch, a Jewish scholar and Zionist. The character of Mordecai Cohen in the novel is presumed to be based on Deutsch.As the brilliant final work of Daniel Deronda, this book retains its appeal due to its gripping plot, the depth of social issues being raised in it and the remarkable characters."

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Adam Bede: (Annotated) (English Edition) Door: George Eliot,

    Books are like mirrors: if a fool looks in, you cannot expect a genius to look out.–J.K. Rowling

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Romola: (Annotated) (English Edition) Door: George Eliot,

    Books are like mirrors: if a fool looks in, you cannot expect a genius to look out.–J.K. Rowling

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Daniel Deronda: (Annotated) (English Edition) Door: George Eliot,

    Books are like mirrors: if a fool looks in, you cannot expect a genius to look out.–J.K. Rowling

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Middlemarch: (Annotated) (English Edition) Door: George Eliot,

    Books are like mirrors: if a fool looks in, you cannot expect a genius to look out.–J.K. Rowling

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Middlemarch (English Edition) Door: George Eliot,

    Middlemarch, A Study of Provincial Life is a novel by the English author George Eliot, first published in eight installments (volumes) during 1871–72. The novel is set in the fictitious Midlands town of Middlemarch during 1829–32, and it comprises several distinct (though intersecting) stories and a large cast of characters. Significant themes include the status of women, the nature of marriage, idealism, self-interest, religion, hypocrisy, political reform, and education.Although containing comical elements, Middlemarch is a work of realism that refers to many historical events: the 1832 Reform Act, the beginnings of the railways, the death of King George IV, and the succession of his brother, the Duke of Clarence (the future King William IV). In addition, the work incorporates contemporary medical science and examines the deeply reactionary mindset found within a settled community facing the prospect of unwelcome change.Eliot began writing the two pieces that would eventually form Middlemarch during the years 1869–70 and completed the novel in 1871. Although the first reviews were mixed, it is now widely regarded as her best work and one of the greatest novels written in English.

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Middlemarch Door: George Eliot,

    By the time the novel appeared to tremendous popular and critical acclaim in 1871-2, George Eliot was recognized as England's finest living novelist. It was her ambition to create a world and portray a whole community--tradespeople, middle classes, country gentry--in the rising provincial town of Middlemarch, circa 1830. Vast and crowded, rich in narrative irony and suspense, «Middlemarch» is richer still in character, in its sense of how individual destinies are shaped by and shape the community, and in the great art that enlarges the reader's sympathy and imagination. It is truly, as Virginia Woolf famously remarked, 'one of the few English novels written for grown-up people'."One of the few English novels written for grown-up people." —Virginia Woolf"What do I think of ‘Middlemarch’? What do I think of glory — except that in a few instances this 'mortal has already put on immortality.' George Eliot was one. The mysteries of human nature surpass the 'mysteries of redemption,' for the infinite we only suppose, while we see the finite." —Emily Dickinson"‘Middlemarch’ is probably the greatest English novel." —Julian Barnes"They've [women] produced the greatest writer in the English language ever, George Eliot, and arguably the third greatest, Jane Austen, and certainly the greatest novel, ‘Middlemarch’..." —Martin Amis

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Daniel Deronda Door: George Eliot,

    Searching for his life’s purpose, young Daniel Deronda is immediately attracted to the beautiful but shallow Gwendolen Harleth during a chance meeting at a casino. As they pursue separate journeys of self-discovery, culminating in Daniel’s discovery of his Jewish heritage, Daniel and Gwendolen reveal much about the depth of their characters and the circumstances that have influenced their lives.Daniel Deronda was George Eliot’s final, and arguably most controversial, novel. Many readers questioned the author’s focus on Jewish characters and culture, and her criticism of their social position in England at that time. This criticism continued well into the twentieth century, when influential British literary critic F. R. Leavis re-released Daniel Deronda, excluding the sections focusing on the Jewish characters, and re-named it Gwendolen Harleth.

  • girls-from-weintraub

    The George Eliot Complete Collection Door: George Eliot,

    This ebook comprises the complete writings of English writer George Eliot.The collection is sorted chronologically by book (or magazine) publication. There are the usual inline tables of contents and links after each text/chapter to get back to the respective tables. The dates of first publication are noted whenever available.Contents:Scenes of Clerical Life. (1858): The Sad Fortunes of the Rev. Amos Barton, Mr. Gilfil’s Love Story, Janet’s Repentance.Adam Bede. (1859)The Lifted Veil. (1859)The Mill on the Floss. (1860)Silas Marner, the Weaver of Raveloe. (1861)Romola. (1863)Brother Jacob. (1864)Felix Holt, the Radical. (1866)The Spanish Gypsy. (1868)Middlemarch. (1871/72)The Legend of Jubal, and Other Poems. (1874): The Legend of Jubal, Agatha, Armgart, How Lisa Loved the King, A Minor Prophet, Brother and Sister, Stradivarius, A College Breakfast-Party, Two Lovers, Self and Life, “Sweet Endings Come and Go, Love,” The Death of Moses, Arion, “O May I Join the Choir Invisible.”Daniel Deronda. (1876)Impressions of Theophrastus Such. (1879)The Essays: From the Note-Book of an Eccentric, How to Avoid Disappointment, The Wisdom of the Child, A Little Fable with a Great Moral, Hints on Snubbing, Carlyle’s Life of Sterling, Margaret Fuller, Woman in France: Madame de Sablé, Three Months in Weimar, Evangelical Teaching: Dr. Cumming, German Wit: Henry Heine, The Natural History of German Life, Silly Novels by Lady Novelists, George Forster, Worldliness and Other-Worldliness: The Poet Young, The Influence of Rationalism, The Grammar of Ornament, Address to Working Men, by Felix Holt, Leaves from a Note-Book.Miscellaneous Poems: On Being Called a Saint, Farewell, Sonnet, Question and Answer, “’Mid my Gold-Brown Curls,” “’Mid the Rich Store,” “As Tu Va la Lune se Lever,” In A London Drawing Room, Arms! To Arms!, Ex Oriente Lux, In the South, Will Ladislaw’s Song, Erinna, I Grant you Ample Leave, Mordecai’s Hebrew Verses, Count that Day Lost.

  • girls-from-weintraub

    The Complete Novels of George Eliot Door: George Eliot,

    Here you will find the complete novels of George Eliot in the chronological order of their original publication.- Adam Bede- The Mill on the Floss- Silas Marner: The Weaver of Raveloe- Romola- Felix Holt the Radical- Middlemarch: a study of provincial life- Daniel Deronda

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Middlemarch (Serapis Classics) (English Edition) Door: George Eliot,

    Middlemarch, A Study of Provincial Life is a novel by the English author George Eliot, first published in eight installments (volumes) during 1871–72. The novel is set in the fictitious Midlands town of Middlemarch during 1829–32, and it comprises several distinct (though intersecting) stories and a large cast of characters. Significant themes include the status of women, the nature of marriage, idealism, self-interest, religion, hypocrisy, political reform, and education. Although containing comical elements, Middlemarch is a work of realism that refers to many historical events: the 1832 Reform Act, the beginnings of the railways, the death of King George IV, and the succession of his brother, the Duke of Clarence (the future King William IV). In addition, the work incorporates contemporary medical science and examines the deeply reactionary mindset found within a settled community facing the prospect of unwelcome change. Eliot began writing the two pieces that would eventually form Middlemarch during the years 1869–70 and completed the novel in 1871. Although the first reviews were mixed, it is now widely regarded as her best work and one of the greatest novels written in English.

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Middlemarch (English Edition) Door: George Eliot,

    Middlemarch, A Study of Provincial Life is a novel by the English author George Eliot, first published in eight installments (volumes) during 1871–72. The novel is set in the fictitious Midlands town of Middlemarch during 1829–32, and it comprises several distinct (though intersecting) stories and a large cast of characters. Significant themes include the status of women, the nature of marriage, idealism, self-interest, religion, hypocrisy, political reform, and education.Although containing comical elements, Middlemarch is a work of realism that refers to many historical events: the 1832 Reform Act, the beginnings of the railways, the death of King George IV, and the succession of his brother, the Duke of Clarence (the future King William IV). In addition, the work incorporates contemporary medical science and examines the deeply reactionary mindset found within a settled community facing the prospect of unwelcome change.

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Middlemarch (Annotated) (English Edition) Door: George Eliot,

    Vast and crowded, rich in irony and suspense, Middlemarch is richer still in character, with two of the era's most enduring characters, Dorothea Brooke, trapped in a loveless marriage, and Lydgate, an ambitious young doctor.

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Daniel Deronda - Classic Novel - [University Of Chicago Press] - (ILLUSTRATED) (English Edition) Door: George Eliot,

    "A lovely young woman gambling at a casino in Leubronn, Germany. A young man watches, fascinated from afar. She begins to lose heavily and leaves the casino. Thus opens the last and probably the most controversial of George Eliot's novels.Published in 1876, Daniel Deronda is also the only one in which the great Victorian novelist portrays contemporary society of her own time. There were only a few murmurs when it first came out, but later, they became a full fledged outpouring of resentment against what many readers felt was an extremely controversial stand on Jewish, proto-Zionist and Kabbalistic ideas. However, it was not just the non-Jewish people who were offended. In 1889, many Jewish people also called for a revision of the book.Whatever the controversies and difficulties that readers had and perhaps still have with the book, it remains one of the most hard hitting and objective portrayals of race, identity, politics, Imperialism, gender bias, religious tolerance and prejudice.The novel actually brings two separate streams of narrative together and they are connected by means of the character of Daniel Deronda, a wealthy young man whose altruistic nature leads him into all manner of troubles. He is the ward of an aristocratic millionaire and knows little about his own birth. Once he comes in contact with the Jewish people, he begins to suspect that he is indeed one of them.Though the title of the story would give the impression that the tale's focus is its eponymous hero, Daniel Deronda, the reader is taken by surprise to find that Gwendolen Harleth shares the limelight in equal measure. She is one of the least lovable of heroines in literature, yet her shallow snobbery, wit, the depth of her despair and her overwhelming narcissism (in one scene we find her kissing her own image in the mirror!) make her an unforgettable character. For her, marriage is a ticket to the higher echelons of society. Caught in an abusive marriage which she entered into for her own ends, she begins to depend on Daniel Deronda whose generous nature makes him ever willing to extend a helping hand.Scholars have noted that George Eliot (or Mary Ann Evans to give her real name) was probably influenced to write Daniel Deronda after meeting Emmanuel Deutsch, a Jewish scholar and Zionist. The character of Mordecai Cohen in the novel is presumed to be based on Deutsch.As the brilliant final work of Daniel Deronda, this book retains its appeal due to its gripping plot, the depth of social issues being raised in it and the remarkable characters."

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Adam Bede - 25Th Anniversary - [Vintage Classics] - (ANNOTATED) (English Edition) Door: George Eliot,

    "A young carpenter falls in love with the village beauty. She, however, has set her sights on a dashing army captain who's the son of the wealthy local squire. Meanwhile, a beautiful and virtuous young woman preacher arrives in the village. What happens to these people and the strange twists and turns that their lives take are described in the rest of the book.Adam Bede was George Eliot's first published novel. Published in 1859, the book has remained a firm favorite with readers and academicians alike and is still taught in many English literature courses all over the world.George Eliot was the pen name of well respected scholar, translator and journalist Mary Ann Evans. She adopted a male pseudonym so she could be viewed as a serious writer. Many Victorian women writers had to combat the prevailing notion that women novelists wrote only light hearted romances or Gothic tales.Eliot was largely a self taught person. Her father was the manager of a stately home in Warwickshire and it was here that Eliot had access to the extensive library. She was a voracious reader and taught herself the Classical languages, which she draws upon extensively in her work. In fact, only one of her seven novels can be set without using Greek typeface. Living on the estate also provided her a view of the immense contrast between the lives of the workers and the landowners.She began writing for a radical left-wing journal, The Westminster Review. One of her essays was titled “Silly Novels by Lady Novelists” in which she criticized the dramatic and over emotional writing style and plots of books written by women. Following this, she decided to disprove the theory that women were only capable of such work. A series of stories entitled Scenes of a Clerical Life was published under the pseudonym George Eliot in 1857. Adam Bede was her first complete novel. It met with immediate success and there was intense speculation about the real identity of its author. When impostors began to emerge, claiming authorship, Mary Ann Evans revealed herself to be the real person behind the name.Adam Bede is notable for its compassion and humane outlook on life. Charles Dickens praised it for its authentic representation of rural life. Though many critics have found the plot to be contrived and subject to frequent “meddling” by the author herself, the story remains interesting and engaging even today more than a hundred years after it was first published."

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Silas Marner (Annotated) (English Edition) Door: George Eliot,

    Wrongly accused of theft and exiled by community of Lantern Yard, Silas Marner settles in the village of Raveloe, living as a recluse and caring only for work and money. Bitter and unhappy, Silas' circumstances change when an orphaned child, actually the unaknowledged child of Godfrey Cass, eldest son of the local squire, is left in his care.

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Romola: (Illustrated) (English Edition) Door: George Eliot,

    Books are like mirrors: if a fool looks in, you cannot expect a genius to look out.–J.K. Rowling