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  • girls-from-weintraub

    Nearly Spanish: Handy words & phrases (English Edition) Door: Patrick Gallagher,

    The Nearly Languages series brings together a series of useful words and phrases in many languages compiled over many years. It is a constant work-in-progress, as new words and phrases are added regularly and refinements are made to the content. But please be clear. This is a labour of love from an enthusiast, not an academic work. I compile these books to be of help, not as a substitute for learning the language formally or doing your own research and I take no responsibility for any confusion that arises in your travels. There are some parts that need improvement; collecting the content from many different sources can lead to mistranslation or misunderstanding. The word “second” is a case in point. In English the context makes it clear whether we are referring to a second in time, or something being second in a sequence. It is quite possible that we have picked up the wrong meaning in our travels and research. Similarly, “spring” as a season may have been misunderstood as a piece of coiled wire! That is why we want feedback from our readers. When we have got it wrong, please tell us. Contact details are at the end of the book.There are no hints about pronunciation in the books, apart from those editions where a different alphabet is in common use for the language. In these cases we show the transliteration of the sounds, often next to the word as shown in the local alphabet. And we also do not tend to show the gender of words, although we may move to this in the future.If you want future iterations to include new words or phrases contact me on social media.This series is designed as downloadable e-books for you to carry with you easily and use as you wish. Whether you use it as a “point and see” reference to show to locals to help you get around, or as a way of getting a flavour of a language, is up to you.Whichever editions of this series you choose to use, remember that language is more than a collection of words. The way different nations put their words and phrases together contributes to fluency. You may pick this up from formal tuition or travel. And remember, English idioms don’t translate literally! Few other nations – even English-speaking ones – will understand the phrase “it’s raining cats and dogs!”Each book is split into sections:Greetings; useful little words; getting around; communication, computers & electrics; the weather; personal pronouns; verbs and I; drinks and mealtimes; clothing; money; colours; family; places; body parts; time; seasons; numbers; months; days; emergency services.Send feedback and suggestions for future editions to:Email:nearlylanguages@gmail.comTwitter: @nearlylanguagesFacebook: Nearly Languages (@nearlylanguages)

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Nearly Swahili: Handy words & phrases (English Edition) Door: Patrick Gallagher,

    The Nearly Languages series brings together a series of useful words and phrases in many languages compiled over many years. It is a constant work-in-progress, as new words and phrases are added regularly and refinements are made to the content. But please be clear. This is a labour of love from an enthusiast, not an academic work. I compile these books to be of help, not as a substitute for learning the language formally or doing your own research and I take no responsibility for any confusion that arises in your travels. There are some parts that need improvement; collecting the content from many different sources can lead to mistranslation or misunderstanding. The word “second” is a case in point. In English the context makes it clear whether we are referring to a second in time, or something being second in a sequence. It is quite possible that we have picked up the wrong meaning in our travels and research. Similarly, “spring” as a season may have been misunderstood as a piece of coiled wire! That is why we want feedback from our readers. When we have got it wrong, please tell us. Contact details are at the end of the book.There are no hints about pronunciation in the books, apart from those editions where a different alphabet is in common use for the language. In these cases we show the transliteration of the sounds, often next to the word as shown in the local alphabet. And we also do not tend to show the gender of words, although we may move to this in the future.If you want future iterations to include new words or phrases contact me on social media.This series is designed as downloadable e-books for you to carry with you easily and use as you wish. Whether you use it as a “point and see” reference to show to locals to help you get around, or as a way of getting a flavour of a language, is up to you.Whichever editions of this series you choose to use, remember that language is more than a collection of words. The way different nations put their words and phrases together contributes to fluency. You may pick this up from formal tuition or travel. And remember, English idioms don’t translate literally! Few other nations – even English-speaking ones – will understand the phrase “it’s raining cats and dogs!”Each book is split into sections:Greetings; useful little words; getting around; communication, computers & electrics; the weather; personal pronouns; verbs and I; drinks and mealtimes; clothing; money; colours; family; places; body parts; time; seasons; numbers; months; days; emergency services.Send feedback and suggestions for future editions to:Email:nearlylanguages@gmail.comTwitter: @nearlylanguagesFacebook: Nearly Languages (@nearlylanguages)

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Nearly Slovene: Handy words & phrases (English Edition) Door: Patrick Gallagher,

    The Nearly Languages series brings together a series of useful words and phrases in many languages compiled over many years. It is a constant work-in-progress, as new words and phrases are added regularly and refinements are made to the content. But please be clear. This is a labour of love from an enthusiast, not an academic work. I compile these books to be of help, not as a substitute for learning the language formally or doing your own research and I take no responsibility for any confusion that arises in your travels. There are some parts that need improvement; collecting the content from many different sources can lead to mistranslation or misunderstanding. The word “second” is a case in point. In English the context makes it clear whether we are referring to a second in time, or something being second in a sequence. It is quite possible that we have picked up the wrong meaning in our travels and research. Similarly, “spring” as a season may have been misunderstood as a piece of coiled wire! That is why we want feedback from our readers. When we have got it wrong, please tell us. Contact details are at the end of the book.There are no hints about pronunciation in the books, apart from those editions where a different alphabet is in common use for the language. In these cases we show the transliteration of the sounds, often next to the word as shown in the local alphabet. And we also do not tend to show the gender of words, although we may move to this in the future.If you want future iterations to include new words or phrases contact me on social media.This series is designed as downloadable e-books for you to carry with you easily and use as you wish. Whether you use it as a “point and see” reference to show to locals to help you get around, or as a way of getting a flavour of a language, is up to you.Whichever editions of this series you choose to use, remember that language is more than a collection of words. The way different nations put their words and phrases together contributes to fluency. You may pick this up from formal tuition or travel. And remember, English idioms don’t translate literally! Few other nations – even English-speaking ones – will understand the phrase “it’s raining cats and dogs!”Each book is split into sections:Greetings; useful little words; getting around; communication, computers & electrics; the weather; personal pronouns; verbs and I; drinks and mealtimes; clothing; money; colours; family; places; body parts; time; seasons; numbers; months; days; emergency services.Send feedback and suggestions for future editions to:Email:nearlylanguages@gmail.comTwitter: @nearlylanguagesFacebook: Nearly Languages (@nearlylanguages)

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Nearly Romanian: Handy words & phrases (English Edition) Door: Patrick Gallagher,

    The Nearly Languages series brings together a series of useful words and phrases in many languages compiled over many years. It is a constant work-in-progress, as new words and phrases are added regularly and refinements are made to the content. But please be clear. This is a labour of love from an enthusiast, not an academic work. I compile these books to be of help, not as a substitute for learning the language formally or doing your own research and I take no responsibility for any confusion that arises in your travels. There are some parts that need improvement; collecting the content from many different sources can lead to mistranslation or misunderstanding. The word “second” is a case in point. In English the context makes it clear whether we are referring to a second in time, or something being second in a sequence. It is quite possible that we have picked up the wrong meaning in our travels and research. Similarly, “spring” as a season may have been misunderstood as a piece of coiled wire! That is why we want feedback from our readers. When we have got it wrong, please tell us. Contact details are at the end of the book.There are no hints about pronunciation in the books, apart from those editions where a different alphabet is in common use for the language. In these cases we show the transliteration of the sounds, often next to the word as shown in the local alphabet. And we also do not tend to show the gender of words, although we may move to this in the future.If you want future iterations to include new words or phrases contact me on social media.This series is designed as downloadable e-books for you to carry with you easily and use as you wish. Whether you use it as a “point and see” reference to show to locals to help you get around, or as a way of getting a flavour of a language, is up to you.Whichever editions of this series you choose to use, remember that language is more than a collection of words. The way different nations put their words and phrases together contributes to fluency. You may pick this up from formal tuition or travel. And remember, English idioms don’t translate literally! Few other nations – even English-speaking ones – will understand the phrase “it’s raining cats and dogs!”Each book is split into sections:Greetings; useful little words; getting around; communication, computers & electrics; the weather; personal pronouns; verbs and I; drinks and mealtimes; clothing; money; colours; family; places; body parts; time; seasons; numbers; months; days; emergency services.Send feedback and suggestions for future editions to:Email:nearlylanguages@gmail.comTwitter: @nearlylanguagesFacebook: Nearly Languages (@nearlylanguages)

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Nearly Swedish: Handy words and phrases (English Edition) Door: Patrick Gallagher,

    The Nearly Languages series brings together a series of useful words and phrases in many languages compiled over many years. It is a constant work-in-progress, as new words and phrases are added regularly and refinements are made to the content. But please be clear. This is a labour of love from an enthusiast, not an academic work. I compile these books to be of help, not as a substitute for learning the language formally or doing your own research and I take no responsibility for any confusion that arises in your travels. There are some parts that need improvement; collecting the content from many different sources can lead to mistranslation or misunderstanding. The word “second” is a case in point. In English the context makes it clear whether we are referring to a second in time, or something being second in a sequence. It is quite possible that we have picked up the wrong meaning in our travels and research. Similarly, “spring” as a season may have been misunderstood as a piece of coiled wire! That is why we want feedback from our readers. When we have got it wrong, please tell us. Contact details are at the end of the book.There are no hints about pronunciation in the books, apart from those editions where a different alphabet is in common use for the language. In these cases we show the transliteration of the sounds, often next to the word as shown in the local alphabet. And we also do not tend to show the gender of words, although we may move to this in the future.If you want future iterations to include new words or phrases contact me on social media.This series is designed as downloadable e-books for you to carry with you easily and use as you wish. Whether you use it as a “point and see” reference to show to locals to help you get around, or as a way of getting a flavour of a language, is up to you.Whichever editions of this series you choose to use, remember that language is more than a collection of words. The way different nations put their words and phrases together contributes to fluency. You may pick this up from formal tuition or travel. And remember, English idioms don’t translate literally! Few other nations – even English-speaking ones – will understand the phrase “it’s raining cats and dogs!”Each book is split into sections:Greetings; useful little words; getting around; communication, computers & electrics; the weather; personal pronouns; verbs and I; drinks and mealtimes; clothing; money; colours; family; places; body parts; time; seasons; numbers; months; days; emergency services.Send feedback and suggestions for future editions to:Email:nearlylanguages@gmail.comTwitter: @nearlylanguagesFacebook: Nearly Languages (@nearlylanguages)

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Nearly Thai: Handy words & phrases (English Edition) Door: Patrick Gallagher,

    The Nearly Languages series brings together a series of useful words and phrases in many languages compiled over many years. It is a constant work-in-progress, as new words and phrases are added regularly and refinements are made to the content. But please be clear. This is a labour of love from an enthusiast, not an academic work. I compile these books to be of help, not as a substitute for learning the language formally or doing your own research and I take no responsibility for any confusion that arises in your travels. There are some parts that need improvement; collecting the content from many different sources can lead to mistranslation or misunderstanding. The word “second” is a case in point. In English the context makes it clear whether we are referring to a second in time, or something being second in a sequence. It is quite possible that we have picked up the wrong meaning in our travels and research. Similarly, “spring” as a season may have been misunderstood as a piece of coiled wire! That is why we want feedback from our readers. When we have got it wrong, please tell us. Contact details are at the end of the book.There are no hints about pronunciation in the books, apart from those editions where a different alphabet is in common use for the language. In these cases we show the transliteration of the sounds, often next to the word as shown in the local alphabet. And we also do not tend to show the gender of words, although we may move to this in the future.If you want future iterations to include new words or phrases contact me on social media.This series is designed as downloadable e-books for you to carry with you easily and use as you wish. Whether you use it as a “point and see” reference to show to locals to help you get around, or as a way of getting a flavour of a language, is up to you.Whichever editions of this series you choose to use, remember that language is more than a collection of words. The way different nations put their words and phrases together contributes to fluency. You may pick this up from formal tuition or travel. And remember, English idioms don’t translate literally! Few other nations – even English-speaking ones – will understand the phrase “it’s raining cats and dogs!”Each book is split into sections:Greetings; useful little words; getting around; communication, computers & electrics; the weather; personal pronouns; verbs and I; drinks and mealtimes; clothing; money; colours; family; places; body parts; time; seasons; numbers; months; days; emergency services.Send feedback and suggestions for future editions to:Email:nearlylanguages@gmail.comTwitter: @nearlylanguagesFacebook: Nearly Languages (@nearlylanguages)

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Nearly Ukrainian: Handy words & phrases (English Edition) Door: Patrick Gallagher,

    The Nearly Languages series brings together a series of useful words and phrases in many languages compiled over many years. It is a constant work-in-progress, as new words and phrases are added regularly and refinements are made to the content. But please be clear. This is a labour of love from an enthusiast, not an academic work. I compile these books to be of help, not as a substitute for learning the language formally or doing your own research and I take no responsibility for any confusion that arises in your travels. There are some parts that need improvement; collecting the content from many different sources can lead to mistranslation or misunderstanding. The word “second” is a case in point. In English the context makes it clear whether we are referring to a second in time, or something being second in a sequence. It is quite possible that we have picked up the wrong meaning in our travels and research. Similarly, “spring” as a season may have been misunderstood as a piece of coiled wire! That is why we want feedback from our readers. When we have got it wrong, please tell us. Contact details are at the end of the book.There are no hints about pronunciation in the books, apart from those editions where a different alphabet is in common use for the language. In these cases we show the transliteration of the sounds, often next to the word as shown in the local alphabet. And we also do not tend to show the gender of words, although we may move to this in the future.If you want future iterations to include new words or phrases contact me on social media.This series is designed as downloadable e-books for you to carry with you easily and use as you wish. Whether you use it as a “point and see” reference to show to locals to help you get around, or as a way of getting a flavour of a language, is up to you.Whichever editions of this series you choose to use, remember that language is more than a collection of words. The way different nations put their words and phrases together contributes to fluency. You may pick this up from formal tuition or travel. And remember, English idioms don’t translate literally! Few other nations – even English-speaking ones – will understand the phrase “it’s raining cats and dogs!”Each book is split into sections:Greetings; useful little words; getting around; communication, computers & electrics; the weather; personal pronouns; verbs and I; drinks and mealtimes; clothing; money; colours; family; places; body parts; time; seasons; numbers; months; days; emergency services.Send feedback and suggestions for future editions to:Email:nearlylanguages@gmail.comTwitter: @nearlylanguagesFacebook: Nearly Languages (@nearlylanguages)

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Nearly German: Handy words & phrases (English Edition) Door: Patrick Gallagher,

    The Nearly Languages series brings together a series of useful words and phrases in many languages compiled over many years. It is a constant work-in-progress, as new words and phrases are added regularly and refinements are made to the content. But please be clear. This is a labour of love from an enthusiast, not an academic work. I compile these books to be of help, not as a substitute for learning the language formally or doing your own research and I take no responsibility for any confusion that arises in your travels. There are some parts that need improvement; collecting the content from many different sources can lead to mistranslation or misunderstanding. The word “second” is a case in point. In English the context makes it clear whether we are referring to a second in time, or something being second in a sequence. It is quite possible that we have picked up the wrong meaning in our travels and research. Similarly, “spring” as a season may have been misunderstood as a piece of coiled wire! That is why we want feedback from our readers. When we have got it wrong, please tell us. Contact details are at the end of the book.There are no hints about pronunciation in the books, apart from those editions where a different alphabet is in common use for the language. In these cases we show the transliteration of the sounds, often next to the word as shown in the local alphabet. And we also do not tend to show the gender of words, although we may move to this in the future.If you want future iterations to include new words or phrases contact me on social media.This series is designed as downloadable e-books for you to carry with you easily and use as you wish. Whether you use it as a “point and see” reference to show to locals to help you get around, or as a way of getting a flavour of a language, is up to you.Whichever editions of this series you choose to use, remember that language is more than a collection of words. The way different nations put their words and phrases together contributes to fluency. You may pick this up from formal tuition or travel. And remember, English idioms don’t translate literally! Few other nations – even English-speaking ones – will understand the phrase “it’s raining cats and dogs!”Each book is split into sections:Greetings; useful little words; getting around; communication, computers & electrics; the weather; personal pronouns; verbs and I; drinks and mealtimes; clothing; money; colours; family; places; body parts; time; seasons; numbers; months; days; emergency services.Send feedback and suggestions for future editions to:Email:nearlylanguages@gmail.comTwitter: @nearlylanguagesFacebook: Nearly Languages (@nearlylanguages)

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Nearly Estonian: Handy words & phrases (English Edition) Door: Patrick Gallagher,

    The Nearly Languages series brings together a series of useful words and phrases in many languages compiled over many years. It is a constant work-in-progress, as new words and phrases are added regularly and refinements are made to the content. But please be clear. This is a labour of love from an enthusiast, not an academic work. I compile these books to be of help, not as a substitute for learning the language formally or doing your own research and I take no responsibility for any confusion that arises in your travels. There are some parts that need improvement; collecting the content from many different sources can lead to mistranslation or misunderstanding. The word “second” is a case in point. In English the context makes it clear whether we are referring to a second in time, or something being second in a sequence. It is quite possible that we have picked up the wrong meaning in our travels and research. Similarly, “spring” as a season may have been misunderstood as a piece of coiled wire! That is why we want feedback from our readers. When we have got it wrong, please tell us. Contact details are at the end of the book.There are no hints about pronunciation in the books, apart from those editions where a different alphabet is in common use for the language. In these cases we show the transliteration of the sounds, often next to the word as shown in the local alphabet. And we also do not tend to show the gender of words, although we may move to this in the future.If you want future iterations to include new words or phrases contact me on social media.This series is designed as downloadable e-books for you to carry with you easily and use as you wish. Whether you use it as a “point and see” reference to show to locals to help you get around, or as a way of getting a flavour of a language, is up to you.Whichever editions of this series you choose to use, remember that language is more than a collection of words. The way different nations put their words and phrases together contributes to fluency. You may pick this up from formal tuition or travel. And remember, English idioms don’t translate literally! Few other nations – even English-speaking ones – will understand the phrase “it’s raining cats and dogs!”Each book is split into sections:Greetings; useful little words; getting around; communication, computers & electrics; the weather; personal pronouns; verbs and I; drinks and mealtimes; clothing; money; colours; family; places; body parts; time; seasons; numbers; months; days; emergency services.Send feedback and suggestions for future editions to:Email:nearlylanguages@gmail.comTwitter: @nearlylanguagesFacebook: Nearly Languages (@nearlylanguages)

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Nearly Norwegian: Handy words & phrases (English Edition) Door: Patrick Gallagher,

    The Nearly Languages series brings together a series of useful words and phrases in many languages compiled over many years. It is a constant work-in-progress, as new words and phrases are added regularly and refinements are made to the content. But please be clear. This is a labour of love from an enthusiast, not an academic work. I compile these books to be of help, not as a substitute for learning the language formally or doing your own research and I take no responsibility for any confusion that arises in your travels. There are some parts that need improvement; collecting the content from many different sources can lead to mistranslation or misunderstanding. The word “second” is a case in point. In English the context makes it clear whether we are referring to a second in time, or something being second in a sequence. It is quite possible that we have picked up the wrong meaning in our travels and research. Similarly, “spring” as a season may have been misunderstood as a piece of coiled wire! That is why we want feedback from our readers. When we have got it wrong, please tell us. Contact details are at the end of the book.There are no hints about pronunciation in the books, apart from those editions where a different alphabet is in common use for the language. In these cases we show the transliteration of the sounds, often next to the word as shown in the local alphabet. And we also do not tend to show the gender of words, although we may move to this in the future.If you want future iterations to include new words or phrases contact me on social media.This series is designed as downloadable e-books for you to carry with you easily and use as you wish. Whether you use it as a “point and see” reference to show to locals to help you get around, or as a way of getting a flavour of a language, is up to you.Whichever editions of this series you choose to use, remember that language is more than a collection of words. The way different nations put their words and phrases together contributes to fluency. You may pick this up from formal tuition or travel. And remember, English idioms don’t translate literally! Few other nations – even English-speaking ones – will understand the phrase “it’s raining cats and dogs!”Each book is split into sections:Greetings; useful little words; getting around; communication, computers & electrics; the weather; personal pronouns; verbs and I; drinks and mealtimes; clothing; money; colours; family; places; body parts; time; seasons; numbers; months; days; emergency services.Send feedback and suggestions for future editions to:Email:nearlylanguages@gmail.comTwitter: @nearlylanguagesFacebook: Nearly Languages (@nearlylanguages)

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Nearly Italian: Handy words & phrases (English Edition) Door: Patrick Gallagher,

    The Nearly Languages series brings together a series of useful words and phrases in many languages compiled over many years. It is a constant work-in-progress, as new words and phrases are added regularly and refinements are made to the content. But please be clear. This is a labour of love from an enthusiast, not an academic work. I compile these books to be of help, not as a substitute for learning the language formally or doing your own research and I take no responsibility for any confusion that arises in your travels. There are some parts that need improvement; collecting the content from many different sources can lead to mistranslation or misunderstanding. The word “second” is a case in point. In English the context makes it clear whether we are referring to a second in time, or something being second in a sequence. It is quite possible that we have picked up the wrong meaning in our travels and research. Similarly, “spring” as a season may have been misunderstood as a piece of coiled wire! That is why we want feedback from our readers. When we have got it wrong, please tell us. Contact details are at the end of the book.There are no hints about pronunciation in the books, apart from those editions where a different alphabet is in common use for the language. In these cases we show the transliteration of the sounds, often next to the word as shown in the local alphabet. And we also do not tend to show the gender of words, although we may move to this in the future.If you want future iterations to include new words or phrases contact me on social media.This series is designed as downloadable e-books for you to carry with you easily and use as you wish. Whether you use it as a “point and see” reference to show to locals to help you get around, or as a way of getting a flavour of a language, is up to you.Whichever editions of this series you choose to use, remember that language is more than a collection of words. The way different nations put their words and phrases together contributes to fluency. You may pick this up from formal tuition or travel. And remember, English idioms don’t translate literally! Few other nations – even English-speaking ones – will understand the phrase “it’s raining cats and dogs!”Each book is split into sections:Greetings; useful little words; getting around; communication, computers & electrics; the weather; personal pronouns; verbs and I; drinks and mealtimes; clothing; money; colours; family; places; body parts; time; seasons; numbers; months; days; emergency services.Send feedback and suggestions for future editions to:Email:nearlylanguages@gmail.comTwitter: @nearlylanguagesFacebook: Nearly Languages (@nearlylanguages)

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Nearly Portuguese: Handy words & phrases (English Edition) Door: Patrick Gallagher,

    The Nearly Languages series brings together a series of useful words and phrases in many languages compiled over many years. It is a constant work-in-progress, as new words and phrases are added regularly and refinements are made to the content. But please be clear. This is a labour of love from an enthusiast, not an academic work. I compile these books to be of help, not as a substitute for learning the language formally or doing your own research and I take no responsibility for any confusion that arises in your travels. There are some parts that need improvement; collecting the content from many different sources can lead to mistranslation or misunderstanding. The word “second” is a case in point. In English the context makes it clear whether we are referring to a second in time, or something being second in a sequence. It is quite possible that we have picked up the wrong meaning in our travels and research. Similarly, “spring” as a season may have been misunderstood as a piece of coiled wire! That is why we want feedback from our readers. When we have got it wrong, please tell us. Contact details are at the end of the book.There are no hints about pronunciation in the books, apart from those editions where a different alphabet is in common use for the language. In these cases we show the transliteration of the sounds, often next to the word as shown in the local alphabet. And we also do not tend to show the gender of words, although we may move to this in the future.If you want future iterations to include new words or phrases contact me on social media.This series is designed as downloadable e-books for you to carry with you easily and use as you wish. Whether you use it as a “point and see” reference to show to locals to help you get around, or as a way of getting a flavour of a language, is up to you.Whichever editions of this series you choose to use, remember that language is more than a collection of words. The way different nations put their words and phrases together contributes to fluency. You may pick this up from formal tuition or travel. And remember, English idioms don’t translate literally! Few other nations – even English-speaking ones – will understand the phrase “it’s raining cats and dogs!”Each book is split into sections:Greetings; useful little words; getting around; communication, computers & electrics; the weather; personal pronouns; verbs and I; drinks and mealtimes; clothing; money; colours; family; places; body parts; time; seasons; numbers; months; days; emergency services.Send feedback and suggestions for future editions to:Email:nearlylanguages@gmail.comTwitter: @nearlylanguagesFacebook: Nearly Languages (@nearlylanguages)

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Nearly Lithuanian: Handy words & phrases (English Edition) Door: Patrick Gallagher,

    The Nearly Languages series brings together a series of useful words and phrases in many languages compiled over many years. It is a constant work-in-progress, as new words and phrases are added regularly and refinements are made to the content. But please be clear. This is a labour of love from an enthusiast, not an academic work. I compile these books to be of help, not as a substitute for learning the language formally or doing your own research and I take no responsibility for any confusion that arises in your travels. There are some parts that need improvement; collecting the content from many different sources can lead to mistranslation or misunderstanding. The word “second” is a case in point. In English the context makes it clear whether we are referring to a second in time, or something being second in a sequence. It is quite possible that we have picked up the wrong meaning in our travels and research. Similarly, “spring” as a season may have been misunderstood as a piece of coiled wire! That is why we want feedback from our readers. When we have got it wrong, please tell us. Contact details are at the end of the book.There are no hints about pronunciation in the books, apart from those editions where a different alphabet is in common use for the language. In these cases we show the transliteration of the sounds, often next to the word as shown in the local alphabet. And we also do not tend to show the gender of words, although we may move to this in the future.If you want future iterations to include new words or phrases contact me on social media.This series is designed as downloadable e-books for you to carry with you easily and use as you wish. Whether you use it as a “point and see” reference to show to locals to help you get around, or as a way of getting a flavour of a language, is up to you.Whichever editions of this series you choose to use, remember that language is more than a collection of words. The way different nations put their words and phrases together contributes to fluency. You may pick this up from formal tuition or travel. And remember, English idioms don’t translate literally! Few other nations – even English-speaking ones – will understand the phrase “it’s raining cats and dogs!”Each book is split into sections:Greetings; useful little words; getting around; communication, computers & electrics; the weather; personal pronouns; verbs and I; drinks and mealtimes; clothing; money; colours; family; places; body parts; time; seasons; numbers; months; days; emergency services.Send feedback and suggestions for future editions to:Email:nearlylanguages@gmail.comTwitter: @nearlylanguagesFacebook: Nearly Languages (@nearlylanguages)

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Nearly Icelandic: Handy words & phrases (English Edition) Door: Patrick Gallagher,

    The Nearly Languages series brings together a series of useful words and phrases in many languages compiled over many years. It is a constant work-in-progress, as new words and phrases are added regularly and refinements are made to the content. But please be clear. This is a labour of love from an enthusiast, not an academic work. I compile these books to be of help, not as a substitute for learning the language formally or doing your own research and I take no responsibility for any confusion that arises in your travels. There are some parts that need improvement; collecting the content from many different sources can lead to mistranslation or misunderstanding. The word “second” is a case in point. In English the context makes it clear whether we are referring to a second in time, or something being second in a sequence. It is quite possible that we have picked up the wrong meaning in our travels and research. Similarly, “spring” as a season may have been misunderstood as a piece of coiled wire! That is why we want feedback from our readers. When we have got it wrong, please tell us. Contact details are at the end of the book.There are no hints about pronunciation in the books, apart from those editions where a different alphabet is in common use for the language. In these cases we show the transliteration of the sounds, often next to the word as shown in the local alphabet. And we also do not tend to show the gender of words, although we may move to this in the future.If you want future iterations to include new words or phrases contact me on social media.This series is designed as downloadable e-books for you to carry with you easily and use as you wish. Whether you use it as a “point and see” reference to show to locals to help you get around, or as a way of getting a flavour of a language, is up to you.Whichever editions of this series you choose to use, remember that language is more than a collection of words. The way different nations put their words and phrases together contributes to fluency. You may pick this up from formal tuition or travel. And remember, English idioms don’t translate literally! Few other nations – even English-speaking ones – will understand the phrase “it’s raining cats and dogs!”Each book is split into sections:Greetings; useful little words; getting around; communication, computers & electrics; the weather; personal pronouns; verbs and I; drinks and mealtimes; clothing; money; colours; family; places; body parts; time; seasons; numbers; months; days; emergency services.Send feedback and suggestions for future editions to:Email:nearlylanguages@gmail.comTwitter: @nearlylanguagesFacebook: Nearly Languages (@nearlylanguages)

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Nearly Esperanto: Handy words & phrases (English Edition) Door: Patrick Gallagher,

    The Nearly Languages series brings together a series of useful words and phrases in many languages compiled over many years. It is a constant work-in-progress, as new words and phrases are added regularly and refinements are made to the content. But please be clear. This is a labour of love from an enthusiast, not an academic work. I compile these books to be of help, not as a substitute for learning the language formally or doing your own research and I take no responsibility for any confusion that arises in your travels. There are some parts that need improvement; collecting the content from many different sources can lead to mistranslation or misunderstanding. The word “second” is a case in point. In English the context makes it clear whether we are referring to a second in time, or something being second in a sequence. It is quite possible that we have picked up the wrong meaning in our travels and research. Similarly, “spring” as a season may have been misunderstood as a piece of coiled wire! That is why we want feedback from our readers. When we have got it wrong, please tell us. Contact details are at the end of the book.There are no hints about pronunciation in the books, apart from those editions where a different alphabet is in common use for the language. In these cases we show the transliteration of the sounds, often next to the word as shown in the local alphabet. And we also do not tend to show the gender of words, although we may move to this in the future.If you want future iterations to include new words or phrases contact me on social media.This series is designed as downloadable e-books for you to carry with you easily and use as you wish. Whether you use it as a “point and see” reference to show to locals to help you get around, or as a way of getting a flavour of a language, is up to you.Whichever editions of this series you choose to use, remember that language is more than a collection of words. The way different nations put their words and phrases together contributes to fluency. You may pick this up from formal tuition or travel. And remember, English idioms don’t translate literally! Few other nations – even English-speaking ones – will understand the phrase “it’s raining cats and dogs!”Each book is split into sections:Greetings; useful little words; getting around; communication, computers & electrics; the weather; personal pronouns; verbs and I; drinks and mealtimes; clothing; money; colours; family; places; body parts; time; seasons; numbers; months; days; emergency services.Send feedback and suggestions for future editions to:Email:nearlylanguages@gmail.comTwitter: @nearlylanguagesFacebook: Nearly Languages (@nearlylanguages)

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Nearly Tamil: Handy words & phrases (English Edition) Door: Patrick Gallagher,

    The Nearly Languages series brings together a series of useful words and phrases in many languages compiled over many years. It is a constant work-in-progress, as new words and phrases are added regularly and refinements are made to the content. But please be clear. This is a labour of love from an enthusiast, not an academic work. I compile these books to be of help, not as a substitute for learning the language formally or doing your own research and I take no responsibility for any confusion that arises in your travels. There are some parts that need improvement; collecting the content from many different sources can lead to mistranslation or misunderstanding. The word “second” is a case in point. In English the context makes it clear whether we are referring to a second in time, or something being second in a sequence. It is quite possible that we have picked up the wrong meaning in our travels and research. Similarly, “spring” as a season may have been misunderstood as a piece of coiled wire! That is why we want feedback from our readers. When we have got it wrong, please tell us. Contact details are at the end of the book.There are no hints about pronunciation in the books, apart from those editions where a different alphabet is in common use for the language. In these cases we show the transliteration of the sounds, often next to the word as shown in the local alphabet. And we also do not tend to show the gender of words, although we may move to this in the future.If you want future iterations to include new words or phrases contact me on social media.This series is designed as downloadable e-books for you to carry with you easily and use as you wish. Whether you use it as a “point and see” reference to show to locals to help you get around, or as a way of getting a flavour of a language, is up to you.Whichever editions of this series you choose to use, remember that language is more than a collection of words. The way different nations put their words and phrases together contributes to fluency. You may pick this up from formal tuition or travel. And remember, English idioms don’t translate literally! Few other nations – even English-speaking ones – will understand the phrase “it’s raining cats and dogs!”Each book is split into sections:Greetings; useful little words; getting around; communication, computers & electrics; the weather; personal pronouns; verbs and I; drinks and mealtimes; clothing; money; colours; family; places; body parts; time; seasons; numbers; months; days; emergency services.Send feedback and suggestions for future editions to:Email:nearlylanguages@gmail.comTwitter: @nearlylanguagesFacebook: Nearly Languages (@nearlylanguages)

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Nearly Polish: Handy words & phrases (English Edition) Door: Patrick Gallagher,

    The Nearly Languages series brings together a series of useful words and phrases in many languages compiled over many years. It is a constant work-in-progress, as new words and phrases are added regularly and refinements are made to the content. But please be clear. This is a labour of love from an enthusiast, not an academic work. I compile these books to be of help, not as a substitute for learning the language formally or doing your own research and I take no responsibility for any confusion that arises in your travels. There are some parts that need improvement; collecting the content from many different sources can lead to mistranslation or misunderstanding. The word “second” is a case in point. In English the context makes it clear whether we are referring to a second in time, or something being second in a sequence. It is quite possible that we have picked up the wrong meaning in our travels and research. Similarly, “spring” as a season may have been misunderstood as a piece of coiled wire! That is why we want feedback from our readers. When we have got it wrong, please tell us. Contact details are at the end of the book.There are no hints about pronunciation in the books, apart from those editions where a different alphabet is in common use for the language. In these cases we show the transliteration of the sounds, often next to the word as shown in the local alphabet. And we also do not tend to show the gender of words, although we may move to this in the future.If you want future iterations to include new words or phrases contact me on social media.This series is designed as downloadable e-books for you to carry with you easily and use as you wish. Whether you use it as a “point and see” reference to show to locals to help you get around, or as a way of getting a flavour of a language, is up to you.Whichever editions of this series you choose to use, remember that language is more than a collection of words. The way different nations put their words and phrases together contributes to fluency. You may pick this up from formal tuition or travel. And remember, English idioms don’t translate literally! Few other nations – even English-speaking ones – will understand the phrase “it’s raining cats and dogs!”Each book is split into sections:Greetings; useful little words; getting around; communication, computers & electrics; the weather; personal pronouns; verbs and I; drinks and mealtimes; clothing; money; colours; family; places; body parts; time; seasons; numbers; months; days; emergency services.Send feedback and suggestions for future editions to:Email:nearlylanguages@gmail.comTwitter: @nearlylanguagesFacebook: Nearly Languages (@nearlylanguages)

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Nearly French: Handy words & phrases (English Edition) Door: Patrick Gallagher,

    The Nearly Languages series brings together a series of useful words and phrases in many languages compiled over many years. It is a constant work-in-progress, as new words and phrases are added regularly and refinements are made to the content. But please be clear. This is a labour of love from an enthusiast, not an academic work. I compile these books to be of help, not as a substitute for learning the language formally or doing your own research and I take no responsibility for any confusion that arises in your travels. There are some parts that need improvement; collecting the content from many different sources can lead to mistranslation or misunderstanding. The word “second” is a case in point. In English the context makes it clear whether we are referring to a second in time, or something being second in a sequence. It is quite possible that we have picked up the wrong meaning in our travels and research. Similarly, “spring” as a season may have been misunderstood as a piece of coiled wire! That is why we want feedback from our readers. When we have got it wrong, please tell us. Contact details are at the end of the book.There are no hints about pronunciation in the books, apart from those editions where a different alphabet is in common use for the language. In these cases we show the transliteration of the sounds, often next to the word as shown in the local alphabet. And we also do not tend to show the gender of words, although we may move to this in the future.If you want future iterations to include new words or phrases contact me on social media.This series is designed as downloadable e-books for you to carry with you easily and use as you wish. Whether you use it as a “point and see” reference to show to locals to help you get around, or as a way of getting a flavour of a language, is up to you.Whichever editions of this series you choose to use, remember that language is more than a collection of words. The way different nations put their words and phrases together contributes to fluency. You may pick this up from formal tuition or travel. And remember, English idioms don’t translate literally! Few other nations – even English-speaking ones – will understand the phrase “it’s raining cats and dogs!”Each book is split into sections:Greetings; useful little words; getting around; communication, computers & electrics; the weather; personal pronouns; verbs and I; drinks and mealtimes; clothing; money; colours; family; places; body parts; time; seasons; numbers; months; days; emergency services.Send feedback and suggestions for future editions to:Email:nearlylanguages@gmail.comTwitter: @nearlylanguagesFacebook: Nearly Languages (@nearlylanguages)

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Nearly Hausa: Handy words and phrases (English Edition) Door: Patrick Gallagher,

    The Nearly Languages series brings together a series of useful words and phrases in many languages compiled over many years. It is a constant work-in-progress, as new words and phrases are added regularly and refinements are made to the content. But please be clear. This is a labour of love from an enthusiast, not an academic work. I compile these books to be of help, not as a substitute for learning the language formally or doing your own research and I take no responsibility for any confusion that arises in your travels. There are some parts that need improvement; collecting the content from many different sources can lead to mistranslation or misunderstanding. The word “second” is a case in point. In English the context makes it clear whether we are referring to a second in time, or something being second in a sequence. It is quite possible that we have picked up the wrong meaning in our travels and research. Similarly, “spring” as a season may have been misunderstood as a piece of coiled wire! That is why we want feedback from our readers. When we have got it wrong, please tell us. Contact details are at the end of the book.There are no hints about pronunciation in the books, apart from those editions where a different alphabet is in common use for the language. In these cases we show the transliteration of the sounds, often next to the word as shown in the local alphabet. And we also do not tend to show the gender of words, although we may move to this in the future.If you want future iterations to include new words or phrases contact me on social media.This series is designed as downloadable e-books for you to carry with you easily and use as you wish. Whether you use it as a “point and see” reference to show to locals to help you get around, or as a way of getting a flavour of a language, is up to you.Whichever editions of this series you choose to use, remember that language is more than a collection of words. The way different nations put their words and phrases together contributes to fluency. You may pick this up from formal tuition or travel. And remember, English idioms don’t translate literally! Few other nations – even English-speaking ones – will understand the phrase “it’s raining cats and dogs!”Each book is split into sections:Greetings; useful little words; getting around; communication, computers & electrics; the weather; personal pronouns; verbs and I; drinks and mealtimes; clothing; money; colours; family; places; body parts; time; seasons; numbers; months; days; emergency services.Send feedback and suggestions for future editions to:Email:nearlylanguages@gmail.comTwitter: @nearlylanguagesFacebook: Nearly Languages (@nearlylanguages)

  • girls-from-weintraub

    Nearly Dutch: Handy words & phrases (English Edition) Door: Patrick Gallagher,

    The Nearly Languages series brings together a series of useful words and phrases in many languages compiled over many years. It is a constant work-in-progress, as new words and phrases are added regularly and refinements are made to the content. But please be clear. This is a labour of love from an enthusiast, not an academic work. I compile these books to be of help, not as a substitute for learning the language formally or doing your own research and I take no responsibility for any confusion that arises in your travels. There are some parts that need improvement; collecting the content from many different sources can lead to mistranslation or misunderstanding. The word “second” is a case in point. In English the context makes it clear whether we are referring to a second in time, or something being second in a sequence. It is quite possible that we have picked up the wrong meaning in our travels and research. Similarly, “spring” as a season may have been misunderstood as a piece of coiled wire! That is why we want feedback from our readers. When we have got it wrong, please tell us. Contact details are at the end of the book.There are no hints about pronunciation in the books, apart from those editions where a different alphabet is in common use for the language. In these cases we show the transliteration of the sounds, often next to the word as shown in the local alphabet. And we also do not tend to show the gender of words, although we may move to this in the future.If you want future iterations to include new words or phrases contact me on social media.This series is designed as downloadable e-books for you to carry with you easily and use as you wish. Whether you use it as a “point and see” reference to show to locals to help you get around, or as a way of getting a flavour of a language, is up to you.Whichever editions of this series you choose to use, remember that language is more than a collection of words. The way different nations put their words and phrases together contributes to fluency. You may pick this up from formal tuition or travel. And remember, English idioms don’t translate literally! Few other nations – even English-speaking ones – will understand the phrase “it’s raining cats and dogs!”Each book is split into sections:Greetings; useful little words; getting around; communication, computers & electrics; the weather; personal pronouns; verbs and I; drinks and mealtimes; clothing; money; colours; family; places; body parts; time; seasons; numbers; months; days; emergency services.Send feedback and suggestions for future editions to:Email:nearlylanguages@gmail.comTwitter: @nearlylanguagesFacebook: Nearly Languages (@nearlylanguages)